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The Land of Fairy Chimneys
 

Cappadocia was known as Hatti in the late Bronze Age, and was the homeland of the Hittite power centred at Hattusa. After the fall of the Hittite Empire, with the decline of the Syro-Cappadocians (Mushki) after their defeat by the Lydian king Croesus in the 6th century BC,

 

Cappadocia was ruled by a sort of feudal aristocracy, dwelling in strong castles and keeping the peasants in a servile condition, which later made them apt to foreign slavery. It was included in the third Persian satrapy in the division established by Darius but continued to be governed by rulers of its own, none apparently supreme over the whole country and all more or less tributaries of the Great King

Following the Battle of Manzikert in 1071, various Turkish clans under the leadership of the Seljuks began settling in Anatolia. With the rise of Turkish power in Anatolia, Cappadocia slowly became a tributary to the Turkish states that were established to the east and to the west; some of the native population converted to Islam with the rest forming the remaining Cappadocian Greek population. By the end of the early 12th century, Anatolian Seljuks had established their sole dominance over the region. With the decline and the fall of the Konya-based Seljuks in the second half of the 13th century, they were gradually replaced by successive Turkic ruled states: the Karaman-based Beylik of Karaman and then the Ottoman Empire.

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Following the Battle of Manzikert in 1071, various Turkish clans under the leadership of the Seljuks began settling in Anatolia. With the rise of Turkish power in Anatolia, Cappadocia slowly became a tributary to the Turkish states that were established to the east and to the west; some of the native population converted to Islam with the rest forming the remaining Cappadocian Greek population. By the end of the early 12th century, Anatolian Seljuks had established their sole dominance over the region. With the decline and the fall of the Konya-based Seljuks in the second half of the 13th century, they were gradually replaced by successive Turkic ruled states: the Karaman-based Beylik of Karaman and then the Ottoman Empire.

 

Cappadocia remained part of the Ottoman Empire until 1922, when it became part of the modern state of Turkey. A fundamental change occurred in between when a new urban center, Nevşehir, was founded in the early 18th century by a grand vizier who was a native of the locality (Nevşehirli Damat İbrahim Pasha), to serve as regional capital, a role the city continues to assume to this day. In the meantime many former Cappadocians had shifted to a Turkish dialect (written in Greek alphabet, Karamanlıca), and where the Greek language was maintained (Sille, villages near Kayseri, Pharasa town and other nearby villages), it became heavily influenced by the surrounding Turkish. This dialect of Eastern Roman Greek is known as Cappadocian Greek. Following the foundation of Turkey in 1922, those who still identified with this pre-Islamic culture of Cappadocia were required to leave, so this language is now only spoken by a handful of their descendants, most now located in modern Greece.

Wikipedia

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Doors of Mustafapasa 

 

Sinasos, nowadays called Mustafapasa, was sort of unofficial "capital" of the Greek population of Cappadocia, once upon a time. The Orthodox/Greeks that had been living for centuries in that region, where sent to Greece in 1923-24, being part of the exchange of populations between Turkey and Greece, according to the Treaty of Laussane. The same thing happened the other way around, with the Muslim/Turks that had been living for centuries in Greek Territory, which took the road to Turkey. Many of the Greeks living in Turkey, were only turkish-speaking and when they came to Greece they were received with suspicion and depreciative characterisations and the same thing happened in Turkey, with many of the Turks that were only greek-speaking.

More than half of the greek population of Cappadocia were turkish speaking (but they wrote the turkish language with greek characters, a "language" often called "karamanlidika"). The rest of them were speaking both languages, turkish and greek, among them the most "clear" greek, could be heared in Sinasos, a small town with great economic and cultural developement, especially in the 19th century. Around that time its population was about 4.000 people (3.500 Greeks). 

The Greeks of Sinasos, were successful merchants in Istanbul, located around Galata, where they controlled much of the fish market. They had the exclusive rights to sell Russian black caviar, thing that made many of them very rich. The never forgot their homeland, sending back money, "investing" in luxurious mansions and establishing 3 greek schools. When they were reaching around the age of 45-50, they were returning to Sinasos to enjoy the "fruits" of their work, their beautiful houses, leaving their jobs in Istanbul to the hands of their sons.

All of them have beautiful, carved and decorated doors, some of which are gathered in this "mosaic".

Hercules Milas

Special experience

Horseback Riding

There is nothing quite like seeing the world from the back of a horse. Riding the beautiful Cappadocian horses around this unique environment will be an unforgettable experience; exploring the hidden treasures in a land that offers attractive and lunar landscapes, filled of magic, tradition and history.

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All in one day with

Jeep Safari

 

One of the most exciting adventures in Cappadocia is exploring the region in an off-road vehicle. Our Jeep Safari tour offers you the best of the best: open-top jeep vehicles for unobstructed views of the valleys, churches and other cultural highlights. We take you to the hard-to-find places and away from the crowds for spectacular views and the excitement of traveling off-road in the unique landscapes of Cappadocia – all in one day.

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Experience the thrill of an
ATV Ride 

You’ll be outfitted with an ATV quad bike by a local guide who will show you the area while performing tricks on his or her own ATV. Ride through the picturesque Rose Valley, Love Valley, Swords Valley and Goreme Valley and marvel at the natural volcanic rock formations, often referred to as ‘fairy chimneys.’ Sip on local wine as you watch the sunset over the valleys before returning to your hotel at the end of the day.

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Rise with a

Balloon 

Cappadocia with it’s Fairy Chimneys is known as one of the best places to fly with a Hot Air Balloon. Capadocia Hot Air Balloon Tour, without doing Cappadocia Hot Air Balloon will not be complete your Cappadocia tours or Cappadocia holiday. Cappadocia Hot Air Balloon will take you to see sunrise and the horizon of Cappadocia while your are flying. Hot air Balloon Tour is the best way to discover.

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Fell in

Trekking 

There are 15 valleys that are frequently walked in the region and have become the classic trekking tracks of Cappadocia today. These tracks can be listed as follows. Baglidere Valley, Güvercinlik Valley, Zemi Valley, Görkündere Valley, Kızılçukur Valley, Güllüdere-I and Güllüdere-II Valleys, Meskendir Valley, Gomeda and Üzengi Valleys, Çat and Fırınasma Valleys, Balkanderesi Valley, Ihlara Valley and Monasteries Valley. We would like to introduce these valleys to you one by one.

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